How to use analog Multimeter

How to use analog Multimeter. A multimeter, commonly known as an AVO (Ampere Voltage Ohm) meter, is an instrument used to detect electrical devices such as current, voltage, and resistance (opposition) in the measurement that has been established.

When utilizing a multimeter, we should first determine the units to be examined. Do not make a mistake that will damage your multimeter.

How to use analog Multimeter

For instance, we’ll set it to the barrier panel regardless of measuring the electric current. A multimeter is separated into two types depending on the read view: an analog multimeter (needle) and a digital multimeter (number).

The reading screen demonstrates the variation between analog and digital multimeters. An analog multimeter employs needles as its testing instrument, but a digital multimeter utilizes a numerical unit and is more complex and modern with the advancement of technology.

Working Of Analog Multimeter

Fundamental directions for using and reading the dimensions of a multimeter for detecting voltage (voltage), electric current (ampere), and resistance (ohm) in an electric circuit are given below.

How to Measure AC Voltage With an Analog Multimeter (ACV)

  • Set the selection switch to the ACV position.
  • Set the size of the selector switch to the largest.
  • Connect the probe to the to-be-measured equipment.
  • Because the probe has no polarity for AC voltage measurements, it is free to plug (determine) the red (+) and black (-) wires on the device to be measured.

Examine the multimeter display for size results. If the tension turns low, change the selector switch to a larger key size to acquire more accurate readings. Devices that use AC voltage include PLN electricity and generators.

How to Calculate DC Voltage With an Analog Multimeter (DCV)

  • Change the direction of the selection switch to DCV.
  • Set the size of the selector switch to the largest.
  • Attach the probe to the to-be-measured equipment.
  • Set the red cable to the positive (+) terminal and the black line to the negative terminal for DC voltage readings (-). Turning upside down is not a good idea.
  • Take a look at the multimeter’s size findings. If the tension turns out to be below, change the selector switch to a larger key size to acquire more accurate readings.
  • Batteries (ACCU) and power supplies DC are two examples of DC-powered equipment.

How to Calculate Electric Current With an Analog Multimeter (DCA)

  • Rotate the selector switch in the direction of the DCA.
  • To protect the multimeter, adjust the current range to its largest size because a multimeter (fuse) will blow if the measured current exceeds the selected size.
  • The electrical current will be measured by connecting the black cord in one segment. Also, one of the other pieces has a red cable.
  • A series set between the voltage source and the multimeter should be made with the record because it is the electric current that is being measured. It’s not the same as measuring voltages and barriers.
  • Next, on the multimeter display, examine the results.

How To Assess Barriers With An Analog Multimeter

  • Set the selector switch in the barrier’s direction ().
  • Set the size of the selector switch to the largest. As a result of its calibration, it usually has an X.
  • Attach the probe to the to-be-measured item. The probe has no polarity for measuring barriers, so you can plugin (specify) the red (+) and black (-) wires on the item to be measured.
  •  The multimeter and the measurement barriers must be in the same plane.
  • Take a look at the quality result on the screen. If the impedance comes out to be too low, swap the selection switch to the opposite X for more precise results.

Conclusion

Another of the most reliable workhorses in the electronics testing industry is the analog or analog multimeter. Analog multimeters have been around for a long time and are sometimes called VOAs because they measure volts, ohms, and amps. These multimeters are incredibly versatile and can detect a wide range of defects in an electronic circuit.

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